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2017 BOOK RELEASE

Monday, April 30, 2018

Has this happened to your book?

Indie authors are being targeted by thieves who impersonate them online, then collect royalties on their books. Learn how to detect and stop book counterfeiting.

Long story made short, Amazon may confiscate royalties from infringing copies of your book and pay them to you, but you’ll need to follow their procedures to the letter:
  1. You must fill out Amazon’s online copyright infringement complaint form, or send a written claim to Amazon’s legal department.
  2. You must file a separate complaint for each Amazon territory (Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.in, etc.)
  3. You must explicitly request reassignment of the infringing copy’s royalties.
Amazon rarely volunteers this information, so it pays to be aware of your rights.


MUST READ: Piracy, Plagiarism, and Impersonation - Part 3 of 3 | Alliance of Independent Authors: Self-Publishing Advice Center

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Finally in 2018? Diversifying book publishing

9 Publishing Organizations that Promote Diversity Within the Industry

This blog post is part of Chronicle Books blog's ongoing Diversity in Publishing series, focusing on the need for inclusion, equity, and diverse voices within the book industry. Read more posts here.

In the same way that diverse talent databases have started emerging in recent years, so too have a number of organizations dedicated to helping do the much-needed work of diversifying book publishing. It’s encouraging to see these groups of passionate individuals who are organizing and working for change in our industry, and the exciting array of resources, programs, networks, platforms, and events they’re creating.

CLICK ON LINKS Below↓

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Dear Indigenous Writer

Writing in all its forms is a scary act; it makes us vulnerable and exposes our softest parts to a world not known for its gentleness. But there’s magnificent power in that vulnerability, and it’s deserving of acknowledgment. And I’m filled with such deep joy each time another powerful voice joins the Indigenous literary world. I hope you’ll think of these words as an honoring and a hope for the important work you’re about to undertake.

In both Canada and the US the mainstream literary scene tends to hold up one or two Indigenous writers at a time, while leaving the rest to fend for themselves. It’s important to help one another, to uphold one another’s work, to celebrate successes and grieve losses, to engage in this beautiful struggle together.

To be an Indigenous writer is to be part of a long legacy of struggle and survivance, of determination to speak truth into a world that too often insists on Indigenous silence.

READ THE LETTER: Letter to an Emerging Indigenous Writer | Literary Hub

Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee Nation) is Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture in First Nations and Indigenous Studies and English at the University of British Columbia. Widely published in the field of Indigenous literary studies, his critical and creative work engages issues of Indigenous being, belonging, and other-than-human kinship. His newest book, Why Indigenous Literatures Matter, was recently released by Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Friday, March 23, 2018

Zines in Indian Country

 
In the age when people publish instantly on Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, and their own blogs, it might be difficult to see where zines--low-tech, photocopied, self-published magazines--have a place. But they're still around. You might find them laying around at your local coffee shop or alternative bookstore. The zine publisher might print one out and mail it to you. Kayla Shaggy's (Diné and Anishinaabe) zine, "Monstrous," is filled with drawings of monsters. She says the format offers "the freedom to do what you want." Self-publishing something that people can hold in their hands is part of the reason for doing it. We'll talk with Native zine makers about why self-publishing a few copies with limited reach is their favorite way to get their creative work out.
 
NEXT MONDAY! Go to Native American Calling on SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/native-america-calling

Monday, January 15, 2018

Robot poets?

For the third consecutive year, through the Turing Tests in Creative Arts, researchers at Dartmouth’s Neukom Institute are soliciting submissions of Shakespearean or Petrarchan sonnets drafted using artificial intelligence.

Maybe the AIs need a better understanding of what we look for in poetry. (ya think?)

sobering read:

The Robots Are Here to Write Poetry

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Smashwords: 2018 Book Industry Predictions

Smashwords: 2018 Book Industry Predictions:

winter is the time to write and consider
Someone figured out how to herd the cats.

A single mousetailer (amazon) has cornered the market for mice.  All the cats run there.

...
4.  Kobo's sales will falter - Kobo, an internationally-focused mid-sized ebook retailer, has been one of the strongest performers in the ebook space over the last four years.  While other retailers slipped and lost market share, Kobo was the little engine that could.  They were smart to get into the business of powering other retailer's ebook stores, and partnering up with indie brick and mortar stores.  Kobo has also had great success supporting indie authors, whose books now account for a sizable percentage of their store's sales.  Yet I don't see how they'll be able to keep their customers long term when they're competing against a retailer that has over 1 million indie ebooks locked up and inaccessible to Kobo's customers.

15.  Calls will grow in the US for antitrust action against Amazon
- This was one of my long shot predictions from last year, and I'm bringing it back because I think it's becoming a growing inevitability.
The US government so far has shown no inclination to restore faircompetition to publishing.  In fact, their bone-headed decision a couple years ago to charge publishers and Apple with pricing collusion only played into Amazon's hands.  But now that Amazon is aggressively disrupting other industries, from grocery and consumer retail to healthcare and transportation, I've got to imagine that the CEOs of the largest most powerful publicly traded companies in the US are going to start directing their lobbyists in Washington, DC to put some controls on Amazon.   If the European Union can make some progress bringing these powerful platforms to heel, it might give DC the backbone it needs.

KEEP ON GOING


Thursday, December 14, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE : Two Worlds hits Amazon, Kobo


December 2017

For Immediate Release

GREENFIELD, MASS- Tragic, true, heartbreaking, astonishing... those words have been used to describe the anthology Two Worlds, the first book to expose in first-person detail the adoption practices that have been going on for years under the guise of caring for destitute Indigenous children in North America.

What really happened and where are these Native children now? 

The new updated Second Edition of TWO WORLDS (Vol. 1), with narratives from Native American and First Nations adoptees, covers the history of Indian child removals in North America, the adoption projects, their impact on Indian Country, the 60s Scoop in Canada and how it impacts the adoptee and their families.


"This book changed history," say editor Trace Hentz. "There is no doubt in my mind the adoption projects were buried and hidden... we adoptees are the living proof."


The Lost Children Book Series includes: Two Worlds, Called Home: The Roadmap, Stolen Generations, and In The Veins: Poetry. The book series is an important contribution to American Indian history.

Trace Hentz (formerly DeMeyer) located other Native adult survivors of adoption and asked them to write a narrative for the first anthology. The adoptees share their unique experience of living in Two Worlds, surviving assimilation via adoption, opening sealed adoption records, and in most cases, a reunion with their tribal relatives. Indigenous identity and historical trauma takes on a whole new meaning in this adoption book series.

Since 2004, award winning journalist Hentz was writing her historical biography “One Small Sacrifice: A Memoir.” She was contacted by many adoptees after stories were published about her work. More adoptees were found after “One Small Sacrifice” had its own Facebook page and the American Indian Adoptees blog started in 2009. In 2011, Trace was introduced to Patricia Busbee and asked her to co-edit the first edition of Two Worlds.

As Hentz writes in the Preface, "The only way we change history is to write it ourselves." This book is a must read for all that want the truth, since very little is known or published on this history.

"I was asked to update this book by one adoptee contributor and I added a new narrative by Levi Eagle Feather, and more information on the 60s Scoop. Please tell your friends and other adoptees," Trace Hentz says. "One day in America, we Lost Children will have our day in court." 

Patricia Busbee is writing a new chapter on her adoptee reunion in the anthology CALLED HOME in 2018. 



  • Series: Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects
  • Paperback: 332 pages
  • Publisher: Blue Hand Books; Second edition (December 11, 2017)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0692372105
  • ISBN-13: 978-0692372104
  • Click on your country:
US UK DE FR ES IT NL JP BR CA MX AU IN


ON KINDLE (more e-readers to be added)

KOBO LINK (in Canada and many other countries!)

Two Worlds: Second Edition (Vol. 1)
Trace L Hentz
SECOND EDITION 2017 Tragic, true, heartbreaking, astonishing... those words have been used to describe the anthology Two Worlds, the first book to expose in first-person detail the adoption practices that have been going on for years under the... Read more


For more information, to order copies, media inquiry, bulk orders, etc: (use contact form on this website)  www.bluehandbooks.org 

Email: bluehandcollective@outlook.com

Monday, October 16, 2017

CreateSpace e-store goes poof




How CreateSpace and e-store changes affects our royalties


CreateSpace-Amazon logos | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksI’m sure many of you will have received the email from CreateSpace (CS) that announces how their own eStore will cease to serve customers on October 31st. Instead, customers will be redirected to Amazon. (We removed the estore from the bottom of this blog.)

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Stolen Generations: Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects (vol. 3)



A new generation of adoptees now include the children of Lost Bird adoptees... 
Ebook proceeds will benefit the IronEagleFeather Project for adoptees.
 

Price: $12.96


ISBN-13: 978-0692615560 (BHB)
ISBN-10: 0692615563
BISAC: History / Native American

A highly anticipated follow up to the history-making anthologies TWO WORLDS (Book One) and CALLED HOME (Book Two): Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects series, STOLEN GENERATIONS: Survivors of the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop offers more narratives on the history of land-taking and child theft/adoption projects in the name of Manifest Destiny in North America. These narratives make clear that Lost Children are not only survivors but resilient.

A collection of adoptees’ firsthand accounts and the historical background of the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop, along with pertinent news, quotes and bibliography, this stunning new anthology has been edited by award winning journalist, adoptee-author Trace L Hentz (formerly DeMeyer). Ebook proceeds will benefit the IronEagleFeather Project for adoptees.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

NEW RELEASE: The Legacy of Lucy Little Bear (novella) on AMAZON

Life on the reservation is not a dream. These stories tell the harsh realities of life with murderous men and murderous weather. Robidoux’s novella of Lucy Little Bear is as rich and complex as life itself. --- “When I was seven my mother tried to kill me.” So begins the journey of Lucy Little Bear in a place “so cold salt water freezes in the bay.” All the characters in these linked narratives find their way into the warmth of your soul. An old woman, Lily Paul, sings in the old language until the fire sings back. She turns into an ermine to survive a perilous journey to her trailer park, “Hollywood,” on coastal Maine. And there is Shawna and the danger of those Moonlight Tours. Robidoux creates a mystical place with her words …where “fog floats in and out with the tide…creating a feeling the world is just a dream.” But life on the reservation is not a dream. These stories tell the harsh realities of life with murderous men and murderous weather. There is “generational loneliness” in the eerie call of a loon on Pennamaquan Lake. There are wonderful place names that live as the characters in the beauty of these stories that transcend the harshness and recall the “star bridge” over which we walked. 
-Diane Glancy, author of Pushing the Bear, Claiming Breath, The Collection of Bodies: Concern for Syria and the Middle East and others 

In these luminous linked stories, Lucy Little Bear is our entrée into the lives of those who live on the Borderlands, between Canada and the US, on Reservation and off, people who live close to the earth and can channel its energies. Weaving elements of story, mystery and dream, tethering the collection with one transcendent description of landscape after another, Robidoux explicates both the deep sadness of the people whose lives have been devalued by the US mainstream for centuries, and also their indomitable strength. 
- Pam Houston, author, Contents May Have Shifted 

The stories in the Legacy of Lucy Little Bear will transport you to Northpoint, Barbara Robidoux’s fictional Maine reservation. The characters there love and kill each other and they sometimes come back to love and try some more. They fight with humor through sadness, and the landscape returns them to each other and to themselves. They enter frozen rivers and come out changed. They enter the old stories and come out in the present, driving slow down icy roads, following sharp curves. They will enter your world and your dreams: they will follow you to the grocery store and ride around in your cart. You’ll be glad for their company. This is a book and a place crafted with care, not easily put down or left behind. 
-Toni Jensen, author,From the Hilltop

$12.95 (paperback)  BUY LINK
NOT AVAILABLE IN EBOOK/KINDLE

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

OJIBWE STYLE MOCCASIN GAME : Makazinataagewin






FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Ojibwe-Style Moccasin Game latest release by Blue Hand Books

GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS (2017) --- Blue Hand Books Collective in Western Massachusetts has just released a new book by first-time author Charles Grolla (Ojibwe) of Bemidji, Minnesota.  His Ojibwe name is Ogimaagiizhig Odoodeman Adikwan.

“The purpose of this new book is to make sure this beautiful game is handed down to new generations,” Ojibwe author Charles Grolla said.  “Traditionally played by men only, it’s probably our oldest Ojibwe men’s game, and moccasin game has been and is still a big part of our Ojibwe culture even to this day. 

“The Ojibwe style of moccasin game is my understanding and what I learned growing up playing this beautiful game, mainly on the Red Lake Reservation,” Grolla said.   

Ojibwe style moccasin game is still played on the Red Lake, Mille Lacs, Nett Lake, White Earth, Leech Lake, Roseau River, and Lac La Croix Reservations.  Tournaments are conducted during pow-wows and celebrations on reservations.

“We are honored to help Charles publish his amazing book with instructions, diagrams and photos to assist new learners,” said Trace Hentz, founder and publisher at Blue Hand Books. “Charles is actively teaching this game in his community and feels it’s his duty to pass down the moccasin game, its history and instructions.”


Saturday, February 25, 2017

NEW on Kindle: Sweetgrass Burning






FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sweetgrass Burning hits Kindle in 2017, was first release by Blue Hand Books in 2016

Greenfield, Massachusetts [2016/7]  -- Blue Hand Books Collective, a small Native American-owned publishing company based in New England, has announced its first title of 2016 is Sweetgrass Burning: Stories from The Rez (paperback in 2016, ebook in 2017)

This debut narrative fiction by Barbara Robidoux comprises linked short stories about the lives of Indians who live at Northpoint, a fictional reservation in northeastern Maine. Robidoux, who’s lived in Maine on the Passamaquoddy reservation (rez), has Eastern Cherokee (Tsalagi), Italian and Scottish ancestry.
“Robidoux’s book covers the everyday events that confront this (rez) community and its struggles against corporate interests to take over tribal land for profit, the opening and rapid closing of a tribal Bingo hall, and the revenge of three elder ladies who cast their humor and rage against prejudiced neighbors in a non-Indian town which borders the rez,” said Trace Hentz, founder of the Blue Hand Books Collective.  “Her characters open their hearts and tell us sometimes angry and often humorous stories about what it takes to stand by their culture and language in the face of state and federal government pressure to assimilate.

“I am a huge fan of Wes Anderson and her stories remind me of the irresistibly good TV program Northern Exposure.  Her storyline and characters make you feel like you’re there in Maine - it’s that good. You’ll think of Dous, the Snoop Sisters, Molly, Edna and the others long after you finish this book,” Hentz said.

Barbara Robidoux is the author of two books of poetry Waiting for Rain (2007) and Migrant Moon (2012).  Her fiction has appeared in the Denver Quarterly, The Yellow Medicine Review, the Santa Fe Literary Review and numerous anthologies.  Robidoux holds a BA from the University of New Hampshire, an MA from Vermont College and is currently a candidate for an MFA in creative writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts.  She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico where she is currently at work on a full-length novel.


Monday, January 30, 2017

IN THE VEINS hits Amazon



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  (January 31, 2017)

LINK

Indigenous Native Poetry collection IN THE VEINS gives power to words


Greenfield, Massachusetts [2017]  --  “These poet’s words jumped off the page and made their way under my skin, into the chambers of my heart,”  said Editor Patricia Busbee (Cherokee) who has edited the new Native prose and poetry book, IN THE VEINS  (Vol. 4,  ISBN: 978-0692832646, Publisher: Blue Hand Books, Massachusetts).  

In the Veins poetry anthology editor Patricia Busbee (adoptee, Cherokee mix) spoke with Dr. Dawn Karima (who also contributed stunning poetry to this book) about Native poetry and our history recently:

LISTEN:
http://talktainmentradio.com/podcasts/Conversation%20with%20Dawn%20Karima%20042417.mp3


Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Did you know?

If you are a book club or doing a fundraiser - did you know you can get a big discount on our books? It's easy. 
Just email: laratrace@outlook.com


Monday, November 7, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Indian Adoption Projects survivors write new history in new book Called Home: The RoadMap



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ISBN: 978-0692700334

Indian Adoption Projects survivors write new history in new book Called Home: The RoadMap

GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS (2016) --- Blue Hand Books Collective in Western Massachusetts has published a second edition of CALLED HOME: The RoadMap Vol. 2 [in the Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects book series].  This edition has been revised and updated with a new book cover.  It includes a new essay The RoadMap: DNA and ICWA, devoted to those adoptees still searching, offering tips on how to open sealed adoption files, how to use DNA tests and the services of search angels, and how the recently-revised Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 could help them.

Sunday, October 9, 2016

Friday, August 26, 2016

Meet Eddie



Eddie Chuculate (Creek-Cherokee)
I was shocked when I received the O. Henry Prize. In fact, I thought the notification was junk e-mail and nearly deleted it. I remember browsing through those yearly anthologies as a youngster in the Muskogee, OK, Public Library after I first became fascinated with short stories. Of course I never imagined I'd one day join that list of famous and not-so-famous. To do so seems like making, in some small way, your small notch in American literature, and for this I am very grateful. The widespread familiarity with the series among people whom I thought had no idea of its existence floored me.
(author photo © Mark Holm/The Albuquerque Tribune) 

Monday, April 25, 2016

Stolen Generations Press Release

BUY LINK

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Greenfield, Massachusetts [2016]  -- Award-winning Native journalist Trace Hentz continues her heart-rending efforts to peel away the malodorous layers of Native American adoption with her newest book, Stolen Generations: Survivors of the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop (Publisher Blue Hand Books).
“What is significant about this new book?  Everything,” Hentz said.  “Ten years ago there were no books on stolen generations.  Now we have more than one generation who have experienced the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop.  These survivors have bravely documented their life experience in their own words in three anthologies (Two Worlds, Called Home and now Stolen Generations) that I’ve compiled so far.”

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